Programm                 "Degeneration und Regeneration– Grundlagen, Diagnostik und Therapie"


Hotelbuchung
   Hotel Registration
Grußwort
   Welcome address
Beteiligte Gesellschaften
   Societies involved
DOG Information
   DOG Information
Eröffnung des Kongresses
   Opening Ceremony
Preise
   Awards
Ablauf der Tagung 2003
   General overview of congress
Lageplan der Räumlichkeiten
   Map of Congress Center
Wissenschaftliche Themen
   Scientific topics
Symposien
   Symposia
Wissenschaftliches Programm
   Scientific program
Posterpräsentationen
   Poster Presentation
Kurse
   Courses
Begleitende Veranstaltungen
   Accompanying program
Arbeitssitzungen
   Working sessions
Rahmenprogramm
   Social program
Allgemeine Informationen
   General Information
Autorenindex
   Index of Authors
Industrieaussteller
   Commercial exhibitors
Sponsoren
   Sponsors
Impressum



DOG Homepage


Abstract
Abstract

Macular Pigment and Antioxidative Prophylactic Strategies

van Kuijk F. J. G. M.1, Trieschmann M.3, Fitzke F.2, Bird A. C.2, Pauleikhoff D.3
1
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston/USA; 2Institute of Ophthalmology, Bath Street, London/UK; 3St. Franziskus Hospital, Münster

Purpose: To review strategies for further investigation of the role of Macular pigment (MP) in prevention of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). MP was first described as a yellow spot in the centre of the human eye, and was later identified as two xanthophyll carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. Lutein and zeaxanthin not only accumulate in the macula, but are also concentrated in the photoreceptor outer segments of the peripheral retina. The mechanism by which MP might influence ARMD is poorly understood. It would act as a blue light filter, thus reducing oxygen radical formation in the underlying photoreceptors.
Method: Previous studies on the role of MP in ARMD are based on measurement of peak optical density of MP in the center, using psychophysical methods. These studies do not take into account the large variation in distribution of MP as observed by autofluorescence imaging here.
Results: Using the autofluorescence imaging method we found that MP peak optical density does not always correlate with the total amount of MP present, and we were able to establish four major distribution patterns of MP in human retina. The most common pattern is primarily found in normal healthy individuals, while


Zurück | Back